chickens, farming, Feed Store, goats, horses, Things I Enjoy

One Thing At A Time

We’re coming up on the two-week mark of running the feed store, and I have to remind myself every day that there is a honeymoon phase to every adventure in life – you know what I’m talking about, right? That time period when everything is bliss, and nothing seems to hard to tackle.

I can’t even fathom a bad day at the feed store. It just doesn’t even seem possible. Every day I wake up, and I’m almost afraid I’m going to realize it was a dream that came while I was asleep…and then I pinch myself and get to enjoy that this is instead, a dream come true.

The ideas I have are endless….I have to keep a notepad near me always. As more ideas come to me, I’m afraid of losing the last one that came to mind. I want to do all the ideas…NOW.

We have our grand opening shindig happening on March 31st from 9am-6pm, and we cannot wait to see every one for that! We are going to have vendors, food, games, and fun. We’ll even be hiding Easter eggs inside and out for the kids to find.

We will have a photographer on scene to capture fabulous photos of your kids! Her name is Paula Lynell and you can find her on Facebook.

I am honored that you continue to shop at the feed store even though it changed hands. I hope to build a relationship with you, to come to know you better with every visit.

I have an event planned for April, and for May, too!

One of my priorities for the feed store is to continue the family friendly legacy, and to drive connection in the community. While I want the feed store to always be a place to get farming and pet staples (like feed and tack) I also want the feed store to be a place of connection between local growers/artisans and the community.

I hope you’ll stop by today and say hi! And I hope you’ll bring the family out on March 31st to celebrate with us.

Until next time…wordswag_1519782540149.png



chickens, farming, goats, horses

The Daily Grind

When I launched this blog and site, I had such high hopes of writing every day to tell the story of our farm. This was my space to explore all the rattling in my head, all of the learning, all of the lessons, and jot it down, and make sense of it, and share it with any one that was interested in the journey of our little farm.

Then life happened, and sometimes in the daily grind, I don’t find myself with time to come write it all out. This is a sad fact for me, one that causes me a bit of frustration. See, I’m a writer by nature, and writing out all of the things that float through my head really helps me sort things out and solidify ideas.

Our farm is in a holding pattern, things are just business as usual at the moment. The chicks haven’t started laying eggs yet, but we’ve wrangled our other two hens and a rooster, and they are all cooping together quite well. We are getting a few eggs from the two hens each week. The ducks are not happy about the cold days, especially when a layer of ice takes over the pond. They come running for dinner, but they still aren’t the friendly pets my kids wish they were.

Risky is lame more than she is not – in fact, at this point, only the kids ride her. I don’t expect her to tote me around with her foot aching. So the boys catch her and use the round pen to climb up on her, and they wander around on her a few times a week. I love that they get to do that now. I long to ride, in fact, my heart aches for a time when I get to climb aboard a horse once more, and ride my afternoon away. I’ve been praying for a solution, but it’s not in the books to go buy another horse right now.

My goats are doing well. When Shimmy dried off, I went through a phase where I was very frustrated with myself for spending what could have been sound horse money on goats. But I had to accept that everything in life has an opportunity cost – taking one opportunity always means saying no to a different one. Once we are in the spring season, with cute baby goats, and milk again, I think it will be easier to remember why I picked goats. The fact that they all come running for scritches whenever I set foot outside is a big help in reminding me that my life just wouldn’t be the same without them.

We did decide that 9 goats was a few goats too many, so we thinned out. Our buckling found a home with girls he wasn’t related to, and three of our does found homes, all with kids to play with like they are used to. One family needed a doe for milk for a kiddo that is lactose intolerant, and the other two does went to a Grandpa because his grandkids were begging him for goats.

That leaves us with 5 goats to enjoy each and every day – 5 is a much more manageable number, and while it was a tough decision, I know we made the right one.

Our livestock guardian dogs do an incredible job fending off predators all night long. We haven’t lost any of our critters to the lurkers. Ana, our female LGD, did get torn up pretty bad just before Thanksgiving – bad enough that she spend several days and nights in the house, locked away in my bedroom/bathroom to recuperate. If you’ve ever met my LGD’s, you know the house isn’t where they want to be. Poor girl, every time she heard her partner Anakin alerting outside, she was restless.

Thanks to a dear friend and her advice and salve, and my precious momma’s extra hands and know how, we were able to get Ana on the road to recovery and today she is as good as new. She is running and playing and making my heart happy with her antics. I was quite worried about my sweet Ana dog.

I’ll be back, hopefully with some measure of consistency, as we continue to learn and grow and love this little country life of ours.